Type of Dental Bridges Used in Dentistry

Tooth loss continues to be a great predicament that faces the world today. Regardless of modern dentistry intervening, more people are losing their natural teeth. Tooth restoration procedures are all geared toward increasing the lifespan of natural teeth. There are several solutions to ensure that adults don’t go without teeth. They include dentures, implants, and dental bridges.

What Are Dental Bridges?

They are appliances used in dentistry to close the gap formed by missing teeth. They work by using dental caps and an artificial tooth to form a bridge in the adjacent teeth and close up the gap in between.

An oral bridge can be used to replace teeth as well as front teeth. Dental bridges for front teeth are not that different from those of back teeth. The only consideration is to choose cosmetically appealing bridges for front teeth.

What Types of Dental Bridges Exist?

Dental bridges are different to cater to varying patient needs. The differences are evident from how the bridges are placed and the materials they feature. The 3 common types of dental bridges used in dentistry are:

  • Traditional bridges – are the most common type of dental bridge. They feature two dental crowns and an artificial replacement tooth. The dental crows re usually fitted over the adjacent teeth of the lost tooth. This ensures that the artificial tooth replacing the missing tooth is properly support on both sides. This type of bridge is popular for tooth replacement of back teeth because it forms a strong bridge.
  • Cantilever bridge – it is an alternative to traditional dental bridges. It features one dental crown and an artificial tooth. The dental crown is attached to one adjacent tooth. It is a go-to solution for patients who have multiple missing teeth. This means that you may not have two adjacent teeth to support the artificial tooth. Cantilever bridges are not as strong as traditional bridges. However, they get the job done, just as effectively.
  • Maryland bonded bridges – they are the most distinct of all types of dental bridges. They feature a porcelain material fused to metal frameworks. The wings of the metal framework are attached to one side of the adjacent tooth for support. They are not strong tooth replacement options. It is why your dentist in long beach CA will tell you that they are mostly used for front tooth replacement rather than for back teeth.

Can You Get Dental Bridges?

Dental bridges are a viable treatment option for anyone with missing teeth. A dentist that takes Medicare can guide you on which type of dental bridge best suits your situation. Even then, it is not everyone who would get a tooth bridge in Torrance. Bridges thrive in the concept of support. Usually, the support has to come from adjacent teeth.

If you have several consecutive missing teeth, you may not qualify for the procedure. In such a case, dental implants have to be inserted before you get the bridges. Alternatively, you can settle for dentures.

Adjusting to Having Dental Bridges

Like with most dental procedures, you should be patient with yourself as you adjust. Given that dental bridges are a foreign addition to your dental composition, you must adjust. The adjustment will be in talking and eating mostly.

At first, your gums might feel sore in the area of treatment. This is before you get used to having dental crowns and an artificial tooth in place. The soreness wears off with time.

Eating and speaking are difficult without teeth. Having oral bridges installed should make these activities easier. However, you need some time to get used to the new status. You may have to start eating soft foods before you can re-introduce yourself to eating hard foods.

How Long Do Dental Bridges Last?

Tooth replacement through dental bridges should not be considered a permanent solution. The bridges can last between 5-15 years. The type of dental bridge you get affects the duration of the appliances. Besides that, the practices you do daily to care for your teeth will affect the lifespan of your dental bridges.

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